Tag / electro-acoustic

Some music you discover, and some simply grabs you instantly. For me, the music of Suba, the brilliant Serbian musician Mitar Subotić, is one of them. The line between atmospheric, ambient, New Age, and environmental music is so thin, that to render one type of music, a certain something misses the whole point. With Mitar […]

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/ September 6, 2017 / Comments Off on David Mingyue Liang: Dialogue With The Ocean (1986)

David Mingyue Liang: Dialogue With The Ocean (1986)

Dr. David Mingyue Liang’s Dialogue With The Ocean merges deep ethnomusicologist study with floating, electronic minimalism for a watery kind of meditative ambient music. With one foot deep in Chinese folk music and another in modern experimental composition, David Mingyue Liang creates something that sounds less like the “Chinese Meditation Music” envisioned by his Tao […]

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/ September 1, 2017 / Comments Off on The Milky Way: Summertime Love Song (1979)

The Milky Way: Summertime Love Song (1979)

Pull out your surfboard, put some sangria on ice, and really enjoy this one. A surprisingly unknown masterpiece, and a rare, rare, rare one at that, of Japanese City Pop, J-AOR, or light mellow, no matter what you call The Milky Way’s Summertime Love Song, one thing you can’t say it is is uninspired. Released […]

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/ August 23, 2017 / Comments Off on Paolo Modugno: Le Bala Et La Mouche (1994)

Paolo Modugno: Le Bala Et La Mouche (1994)

Man, what a world to we live in. Just this year Italy’s Archeo Recordings reissued Paolo Modugno’s intriguing debut Brise D’Automne. Once a member of Italian multi-media performance group O.A.S.I., what turned as a love for Middle Eastern and African music transformed into the exploration of new ways to interconnect the electronic with the acoustic […]

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/ August 18, 2017 / Comments Off on Joachim Witt: Moonlight Nights (1985)

Joachim Witt: Moonlight Nights (1985)

If anyone knows me, they’d know this album forms a perfect storm of what I dig about music. I love it when someone actually aims to “sell out” by doing it in such a way that everyone is left dumbfounded by the product of that intended vision. There is one “right” way to pull that […]

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Hard to describe what’s going on in Triangulus and Björn J:son Lindh. The closest analog I could think of would be what would happen if the Alan Parson’s Project relocated to the island of Majorca and replaced their members with Swedish electro-acoustic minimalists. Imagine a very math-y (complex, musical time signatures galore) version of Balearic […]

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/ August 4, 2017 / Comments Off on Hajime Mizoguchi: Halfinch Dessert (1986)

Hajime Mizoguchi: Halfinch Dessert (1986)

These are the things that surprise sometimes. I went into researching some background story behind Hajime Mizoguchi’s deeply affecting Halfinch Dessert and wound up uncovering that their is some meaning behind this album. Hajime Mizoguchi was born and raised in Tokyo. By the age of eleven he had chosen to educate himself in the ways […]

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/ July 28, 2017 / Comments Off on Motohiko Hamase: #Notes Of Forestry (1988)

Motohiko Hamase: #Notes Of Forestry (1988)

What’s with Japanese session bass players? Yoshio Suzuki, Tsugutoshi Goto, Hirobumi Suzuki, etc. and now Motohiko Hamase, all at one point or another decide to show the world that they can do more than lay down a tasty bass line. #Notes of Forestry shows exactly how fascinating their own ideas can be when they’re given […]

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/ July 26, 2017 / Comments Off on Ritmia: Forse Il Mare (1986)

Ritmia: Forse Il Mare (1986)

Nothing makes one cringe more than when someone tries to “modernize” traditional music. The issue isn’t with modernization but with trying to will it so that “traditional” music has no way of becoming modern other than by adding modernity to it. What does this all mean? It means that the jaw-dropping music of Italian quartet […]

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/ July 7, 2017 / Comments Off on Takashi Toyoda: Big Bang (1985)

Takashi Toyoda: Big Bang (1985)

Takashi Toyoda’s Big Bang promises in the back cover “total spiritual stability and stress relief” through 40-odd minutes of Japanese New Age music. What really stands out, though, is the word “BIG BANG” in the album title. Attempting to provide some respite from a stark external world, Takashi tries to create the first 1/f fluctuation […]

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